Publications

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Circadian cycle dependent EEG biomarkers of pathogenicity in adult mice following prenatal exposure to in utero inflammation

Abstract:
Intrauterine infection or inflammation in preterm neonates is a known risk for adverse neurological outcomes, including cognitive, motor and behavioral disabilities. Our previous data suggest that there is acute fetal brain inflammation in a mouse model of intrauterine exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). We hypothesized that the in utero inflammation induced by LPS produces long-term EEG biomarkers of neurodegeneration in the exposed mice that could be determined by using continuous quantitative video-EEG-EMG analyses. A single LPS injection at E17 was performed in pregnant CD1 dams. Control dams were injected with same volumes of saline (LPS n=10, Control n=8). At postnatal age of P90-100, 24h synchronous video/EEG/EMG recordings were done using a tethered recording system and implanted subdural electrodes. Behavioral state scoring was performed blind to treatment group, on each 10 second EEG epochs using synchronous video, EMG and EEG trace signatures to generate individual hypnograms. Automated EEG power spectrums were analyzed for delta and theta-beta power ratios during wake vs. sleep cycles. Both control and LPS hypnograms showed an ultradian wake/sleep cycling. Since rodents are nocturnal animals, control mice showed the expected diurnal variation with significantly longer time spent in wake states during the dark cycle phase. In contrast, the LPS treated mice lost this circadian rhythm. Sleep microstructure also showed significant alteration in the LPS mice specifically during the dark cycle, caused by significantly longer average NREM cycle durations. No significance was found between treatment groups for the delta power data; however, significant activity dependent changes in theta-beta power ratios seen in controls were absent in the LPS-exposed mice. In conclusion, exposure to in utero inflammation in CD1 mice resulted in significantly altered sleep architecture as adults that were circadian cycle and activity state dependent.

 

Heightened Delta Power during Slow-Wave-Sleep in Patients with Rett Syndrome Associated with Poor Sleep Efficiency

Abstract:
Sleep problems are commonly reported in Rett syndrome (RTT); however the electroencephalographic (EEG) biomarkers underlying sleep dysfunction are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the temporal evolution of quantitative EEG (qEEG) biomarkers in overnight EEGs recorded from girls (2–9 yrs. old) diagnosed with RTT using a non-traditional automated protocol. In this study, EEG spectral analysis identified high delta power cycles representing slow wave sleep (SWS) in 8–9h overnight sleep EEGs from the frontal, central and occipital leads (AP axis), comparing age-matched girls with and without RTT. Automated algorithms quantitated the area under the curve (AUC) within identified SWS cycles for each spectral frequency wave form. Both age-matched RTT and control EEGs showed similar increasing trends for recorded delta wave power in the EEG leads along the antero-posterior (AP). RTT EEGs had significantly fewer numbers of SWS sleep cycles; therefore, the overall time spent in SWS was also significantly lower in RTT. In contrast, the AUC for delta power within each SWS cycle was significantly heightened in RTT and remained heightened over consecutive cycles unlike control EEGs that showed an overnight decrement of delta power in consecutive cycles. Gamma wave power associated with these SWS cycles was similar to controls. However, the negative correlation of gamma power with age (r = -.59; p<0.01) detected in controls (2–5 yrs. vs. 6–9 yrs.) was lost in RTT. Poor % SWS (i.e., time spent in SWS overnight) in RTT was also driven by the younger age-group. Incidence of seizures in RTT was associated with significantly lower number of SWS cycles. Therefore, qEEG biomarkers of SWS in RTT evolved temporally and correlated significantly with clinical severity.

 

Sleep dysfunction following neonatal ischemic seizures are differential by neonatal age of insult as determined by qEEG in a mouse model

Abstract:
Neonatal seizures associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) pose a challenge in their acute clinical management and are often followed by long-term neurological consequences. We used a newly characterized CD-1 mouse model of neonatal ischemic seizures associated with age-dependent (P7 vs. P10) seizure severity and phenobarbital efficacy (i.e.; PB-resistant vs. PB-efficacious respectively) following unilateral carotid ligation. The long-term consequences following untreated neonatal seizures in P7 vs. P10 ligated pups were investigated using neurobehavioral testing, 24 h v- quantitative EEG -EMG (qEEG, qEMG), and western blot analyses in adult mice. Significant hyperactivity emerged in a small sub-set of mice in both age-groups associated with a failure to habituate during open-field (OF) testing. 24 h continuous qEEGs detected significantly altered sleep architecture due to long-wake cycles in both age-groups. Delta power (0.5-4 Hz) quantification during slow-wave-sleep (SWS) revealed significant SWS compensation in P10 ligates following periods of increased sleep pressure which the P7 ligate group failed to show. Theta/beta ratios deemed as negative correlation markers of attentional control were significantly higher only in the P10 ligates. These results indicate that neonatal age-dependent differences in the characteristics of ischemic neonatal seizures in CD-1 pups differentially modulate long-term outcomes, when evaluated with v-qEEG/EMG as adults.